• Author: Emiliano Romanelli
  • Title: 333 Loops (Volume 1)
  • Catalog: Terziruolo # 02
  • Release: 14th April 2014
  • Media: CD + Trifold / Digital
  • Duration: 35′00″
  • Edition: 200 / Unlimited
  • Part I – 000148 of 110889 – 15′00″
  • Part II – 000149 of 110889 – 11′00″
  • Part III – 000150 of 110889 – 9′00″

Recorded live at the cloister of Ex Convento dei Cappuccini, Colli del Tronto, Italy as part of Within 01 festival, on Friday 13th September 2013, 10:45 PM.

Emiliano Romanelli: 333 loops, computer with custom software, usb audio interface, mixing board, quadraphonic sound diffusion

Hand-numbered edition of 200 copies.

Trifold – Dimension: 14.0 x 14.2 cm (closed); Paper: Mohawk Superfine Eggshell Ultrawhite 270 gm²; Extent: recto; Print: letterpress; Color: black; Font: Adobe Minion Pro; Sleeve: clear bag

CD – Dimension: ⌀ 12 cm; Print: serigraphic; Color: black and white; Font: Adobe Minion Pro; Sleeve: nonwoven sleeve

Digital – Format: FLAC and ALAC lossless files; Sound quality: 48kHz / 24-bit / Stereo (converted directly from the original digital master)

Cover photo taken at Ex Convento's botanical garden.

“The future is a monotonous instrument.”
— Francis Picabia

333 Loops (Volume 1) is the first chapter of a CD/DL live series, which documents the sound events generated by the homonymous modular system, designed in 2011 by the Italian musician Emiliano Romanelli.

The system is composed by an archive of 333 pre-recorded sound loops, produced between 2008 and 2011 by a sound synthesis software played in different acoustic environments, and documented mainly with internal microphones of several digital and analog portable recorders. Subsequently, by a custom software (2 loop players, 2 EQs, 4 delays, 1 digital room reverb, 4 LFOs), the loops are used as modules in a random process of juxtapositions (A//B) and multiplications (333²), able to generate live 110889 sound events to be diffused in the room via a multichannel sound system. 333 Loops as a possible field of investigation, lasting between 110889 seconds and 110889 years.

The Volume 1 is the stereo documentation of the quadraphonic live performance at the medieval cloister of Ex Convento dei Cappuccini, Colli del Tronto, Italy as part of Within 01 festival, on Friday 13th September 2013, 10:45 PM. This album also represents Romanelli's live and discographic debut, after over 13 years with the multimedia duo Tu m' (1998–2011).

Emiliano Romanelli (b. 1979) is an Italian electronic musician and graphic designer who lives and works in Città Sant'Angelo, Italy. During the 1990s, he studied graphic design and photography at Istituto Statale d'Arte in Pescara; and in parallel, he studied organology and electronic music for computer privately.

In 1998, he co-founded the multimedia duo Tu m', where he worked as musician, visual artist, graphic designer and curator until 2011. The duo's compositions have been released by labels including Line (USA), Headz (Japan), Dekorder (Germany) and others. Their audio-visual works have been exhibited in various museums and galleries including Castello di Rivoli (Torino, Italy); Arnolfini (Bristol, UK); Oboro (Montreal, Canada) and others.

In 2012, Romanelli began an ongoing project focused on the generative systems and the perceptual relationships between sound, light and space. His works are published by Terziruolo (Italy). www.emilianoromanelli.com

Emiliano Romanelli, 333 Loops (Volume 1), Terziruolo # 02, 2014

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“[…] this is the sound of an experienced master of ambient music at work: refined and well developed, meditative and enveloping, the piece nonetheless sounds fresh, inventive, even surprising. Those who have accuse ambient music of having run out of new ideas would do well to give 333 Loops a listen.”
Nathan Thomas for Fluid Radio

“[…] Emiliano Romanelli's work is similarly an exploration through perception, and like Newman's painting 333 Loops requires an active engagement on behalf of the audience.”
Joseph Sannicandro for A Closer Listen

“[…] A pulse is occasionally felt, though more a kind of rotational recursion, like a musicized Calder mobile ... There's something strangely eerie about it, a feeling further cemented by a Picabia quote, whose sinister resonance tells of possible dystopian traces beneath a deceptively serene skin.”
Alan Lockett for Igloo Magazine

“[…] tranquil and open sound fluids able to take perception into sublime fields, submerging the ears into an atmosphere that you don't get to remember because it remains floating in a place between the silent ghosts of the past and ‘the monotonous sound of the future’. An endless listening.”
Miguel Isaza for Infinite Grain

“[…] once in a while, I'm just as immediately captivated, as is the case here.”
Brian Olewnick for Just Outside

“[…] Not forcing it upon the listener, but rather filing up spaces. It's surely excellent music and I enjoyed it”
Frans de Waard for Vital Weekly

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